Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Unitary ExecutivePresidential Power from Washington to Bush$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Steven G. Calabresi and Christopher S. Yoo

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780300121261

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300121261.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

John Tyler

John Tyler

Chapter:
(p.133) 10 John Tyler
Source:
The Unitary Executive
Author(s):

Steven G. Calabresi

Christopher S. Yoo

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300121261.003.0015

This chapter discusses John Tyler's accession to chief executive due to William Henry Harrison's untimely demise just a month into his term as president. This dismayed Whig leaders in Congress because most of them accepted Harrison as a “birthright” Whig whose other party loyalties were basically secure, despite his apostasy in many areas of Whig presidential doctrine. Tyler, a traditional states' rights Democrat who had joined the Whig ticket in the spirit of anti-Jackson coalition, did not inspire similar confidence among the Whigs. Many congressional Whig leaders immediately attempted to undermine his nascent presidency by advancing the textually plausible claim that the Constitution did not permit a vice president to actually become president but instead only allowed the vice president to adopt the role of “acting president” while continuing in the official title of vice president.

Keywords:   birthright Whig, John Tyler, Whig leaders, Whig presidential doctrine, states' rights Democrat, anti-Jackson coalition, acting president

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.