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The Mongols and the Islamic WorldFrom Conquest to Conversion$
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Peter Jackson

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780300125337

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300125337.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 23 October 2019

Pax Mongolica and a Transcontinental Traffic

Pax Mongolica and a Transcontinental Traffic

Chapter:
(p.210) 8 Pax Mongolica and a Transcontinental Traffic
Source:
The Mongols and the Islamic World
Author(s):

Peter Jackson

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300125337.003.0009

This chapter examines the conditions created by the Mongol conquests, summed up in the phrase Pax Mongolica, and the role of the Silk Roads in the transcontinental travel andcommunication to which the Mongols had given impetus. It begins with a discussion of commodities traded in Mongol Asia, including spices, silks and other luxury textiles, pearls, precious stones, bullion and furs. It then considers the Mongols' diversion of trade routes within Western Asia and their role in the emergence of new termini, along with the steps taken by Mongol khans to foster trade. It also analyses the obstacles and risks involved in overland trade and travel in the era of the successor-states, the growth in the maritime trade of Asia during the Mongol epoch, and the limits of cultural diffusion brought by transcontinental trade across Mongol Asia.

Keywords:   transcontinental trade, Pax Mongolica, Silk Roads, transcontinental travel, Mongols, commodities, trade routes, Western Asia, maritime trade, cultural diffusion

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