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Law's EnvironmentHow the Law Shapes the Places We Live$
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John Copeland Nagle

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780300126297

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300126297.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 04 June 2020

Lights Out

Lights Out

Alamocordo, New Mexico

Chapter:
(p.196) Chapter Five Lights Out
Source:
Law's Environment
Author(s):

John Copeland Nagle

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300126297.003.0006

This chapter is concerned with the city of Alamogordo, located in southern New Mexico. Alamogordo began as the late-nineteenth-century version of a planned community. Before then, various unplanned human communities wandered through the region for centuries, including a pueblo that was located within today's city limits. The Apaches arrived in the area around 1500. Spain claimed the land in 1598, though it never really attempted to exercise control over it. Sovereignty shifted to Mexico in 1821 and then to the United States thanks to the resolution of the Mexican War by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848. Ranchers, miners, and farmers moved into the land from Texas after the Civil War, and the natives were forced to the Mescalero Apache Reservation just north of Alamogordo by an executive order signed by President Ulysses S. Grant in 1873.

Keywords:   southern New Mexico, Alamogordo, planned community, pueblo, Apaches, Mexican War

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