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Civil Society and EmpireIreland and Scotland in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World$
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James Livesey

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780300139020

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300139020.001.0001

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The Experience of Empire

The Experience of Empire

The Black Family, Britons, and the Emergence of Society

Chapter:
(p.128) Chapter Four The Experience of Empire
Source:
Civil Society and Empire
Author(s):

James Livesey

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300139020.003.0005

This chapter looks at the experience of empire, via presenting a history and the writings of the family of John Black during the eighteenth century. The Blacks were a family of Aberdeen extraction, which included both Presbyterian and conforming members. On the side of politics, they were pro-Stuart at first, but this changed when they moved to Ireland as part of the opposition to Cromwell. In the 1690s, they started to support the Williamites. The Black family were a family of traders, and with their dealings with several countries, they clearly understood the relativity of cultural norms and identities. Their most famous member, John Black, showed the family's flexibility by maneuvering around both Britain and France during the Seven Years War, which he did in order to protect his assets in Bordeaux.

Keywords:   eighteenth century, John Black, cultural norms, Black family

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