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The Global Spread of Fertility DeclinePopulation, Fear, and Uncertainty$
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Jay Winter and Michael Teitelbaum

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780300139068

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300139068.001.0001

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Japan

Japan

Family Structure, Abortion, and Fertility since 1945

Chapter:
(p.169) Six Japan
Source:
The Global Spread of Fertility Decline
Author(s):

Jay Winter

Michael Teitelbaum

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300139068.003.0006

This chapter shows that, despite Japan's fertility rates being close to those of China, the postwar history of fertility decline in these two countries was remarkably different. Japan industrialized much earlier and experienced low fertility rates during the 1930s, but, in addition, the immediate postwar history of Japan reflected three political, demographic, and economic vectors: direct occupation by foreign powers, dramatic fertility declines based on widespread abortion rather than contraception or sterilization, and what eventually came to be called the Japanese postwar “economic miracle”—sustained and rapid export-led economic growth that established Japan as the second largest national economy in the world by the late 1960s.

Keywords:   postwar history, Japan's fertility rates, China, fertility decline, economic miracle

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