Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
A Smart Energy PolicyAn Economist's Rx for Balancing Cheap, Clean, and Secure Energy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James M. Griffin

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780300149852

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300149852.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 07 December 2021

The Three Conflicting Goals of Energy Policy

The Three Conflicting Goals of Energy Policy

Chapter:
(p.11) Chapter 1 The Three Conflicting Goals of Energy Policy
Source:
A Smart Energy Policy
Author(s):

James M. Griffin

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300149852.003.0002

This chapter explains that the energy policy is fatally flawed both in the process by which problems are identified and in the solutions that are chosen. In the vernacular of the economist, cheap energy plays a vital role in raising the productivity of workers because it allows the substitution of inanimate energy for animate energy. Subsidies are a contrivance because they only appear to make energy cheap from an economist's perspective. Fossil fuels historically have been the cheapest energy sources and probably will continue to be the cheapest energy sources for the foreseeable future. Getting the prices right means including in the market price the premiums that a society should be willing to pay for clean and secure energy, and also means eliminating the need for ad hoc command-and-control solutions, congressional beauty pageants, and indiscriminate choices among a range of policy options put forward by special-interest groups.

Keywords:   energy policy, cheap energy, subsidies, fossil fuels, energy sources, prices

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.