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Liberty's DawnA People's History of the Industrial Revolution$
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Emma Griffin

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780300151800

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300151800.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

Education

Education

Chapter:
(p.165) Chapter Seven Education
Source:
Liberty's Dawn
Author(s):

Emma Griffin

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300151800.003.0007

A combination of poverty and industrialization prevented ordinary working people in Britain from attending school. The industrial revolution forced children to find employment at a very young age, often as early as ten years old. The lack of education is evident in the autobiographies written by the workers themselves, who lament the poor quality, brevity, or even complete absence of the teaching they had received in childhood. In the early part of the nineteenth century, new solutions to the problem of gaining an education enhanced the prospects for self-improvement. These include commercial and benevolent night schools, reading clubs, Sunday schools for teenagers and adults, mutual improvement societies, and Mechanics' Institutes—all of which helped improve the literacy of the ordinary workers.

Keywords:   education, industrialization, Britain, autobiographies, night schools, reading clubs, Sunday schools, mutual improvement societies, Mechanics' Institutes

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