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The Birth of Christian HistoryMemory and Time from Mark to Luke-Acts$
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Eve-Marie Becker

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780300165098

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300165098.001.0001

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Transforming Memory into Literary Narratives about the Past

Transforming Memory into Literary Narratives about the Past

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Transforming Memory into Literary Narratives about the Past
Source:
The Birth of Christian History
Author(s):

Eve-Marie Becker

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300165098.003.0001

This chapter reflects on the early Christian shape of literary religious memory. The earliest Christian memorial culture does not stand alone. In order to develop, especially by literary means, it reiterates basic patterns that already circulate in its surrounding world. While maintaining continuity with both the Hebrew and Septuagint versions, the influence of Roman memorial culture is decisive in terms of how Christian groups organize their memoria. Moreover, early Christian authors tend to maintain the concepts of memory which are constitutive for Israel's history with God. In the New Testament writings, the concept of memory—which predates history-writing—is affiliated with a variety of contexts: ritual practices, the memorization of Jesus's teaching, and certain events and experiences.

Keywords:   religious memory, memoria, literary religious memory, memorial culture, early Christian authors, Israeli history, history-writing, counter-memory

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