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Against the Profit MotiveThe Salary Revolution in American Government, 1780-1940$
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Nicholas R. Parrillo

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780300176582

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300176582.001.0001

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Incarceration

Incarceration

Jailors' Fees and Penitentiary Profits

Chapter:
(p.295) 8 Incarceration
Source:
Against the Profit Motive
Author(s):

Nicholas R. Parrillo

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300176582.003.0009

This chapter turns to the experiment with bounty-seeking as an instrument of modern governance which was particularly intense in the context of incarceration. Throughout Anglo-American history, incarceration has been a significant public function, and for about two hundred years, it has been the principal punishment for crime. The tasks of incarcerators have been several. Taken together, these tasks have created many opportunities for the incarcerators to coerce the inmates and to make mutually beneficial exchanges with them. Accordingly, the history of incarcerators' compensation— and the broader history of social relations between them and their charges—has involved a complex and changing mixture of facilitative payments, bounties, and salaries.

Keywords:   bounty-seeking, modern governance, incarceration, crime, coercion, salaries, payments

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