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Building a New Jerusalem$
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Francis J. Bremer

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780300179132

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300179132.001.0001

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The Dutch Interlude—Controversy in Amsterdam

The Dutch Interlude—Controversy in Amsterdam

Chapter:
(p.109) Chapter 8 The Dutch Interlude—Controversy in Amsterdam
Source:
Building a New Jerusalem
Author(s):

Francis J. Bremer

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300179132.003.0009

This chapter explains that while moving to Amsterdam, John Davenport was exposed to new ideas and customs which led him to rethink much of what he had taken for granted. It is likely that he engaged himself with members of the Jewish community, and in particular with the prominent rabbi Menasseh Ben Israel. The Congregationalist faction in the Amsterdam church next turned to Davenport, with James Crisp inviting him to preach on a trial basis. While Paget viewed his private preaching as schismatic, Davenport rejected the charge, pointing out that he had taken care and that the sessions did not conflict with the services in the Beguinage. Although he considered publishing his own account of why he had left England and of his experiences in Amsterdam, Davenport assured Ambassador Boswell that he would do so only if false charges about him continued to circulate.

Keywords:   Amsterdam, John Davenport, Jewish community, Congregationalist, church

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