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Barley, Gold, or FiatToward a Pure Theory of Money$
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Thomas Quint and Martin Shubik

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780300188158

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300188158.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

Markets with Fiat

Markets with Fiat

Chapter:
(p.94) Chapter 7 Markets with Fiat
Source:
Barley, Gold, or Fiat
Author(s):

Thomas Quint

Martin Shubik

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300188158.003.0007

We study markets with fiat as the money. Mathematically speaking, fiat money models reduce to equivalent models using consumable storable money. We discuss the Hahn paradox, whereby in some models with worthless fiat and no loan markets, trade can be extinguished. We then present two models that avoid the Hahn paradox, a no-loan market with a positive salvage value for fiat, and a model with a strategic dummy bank. In the model with banking, we point out that the bank has two types of action: 1) an interest rate strategy whereby it lends whatever amount of money is needed to maintain the interest rate at an exogenously given rho; or 2) a money supply strategy, whereby it lends out the same exogenously given amount of money no matter what. Comparisons are made between otherwise identical models with gold compared with fiat.

Keywords:   fiat money, Hahn paradox, interest rate vs money supply, rational expectations, strategic dummy bank

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