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Emerson's ProtégésMentoring and Marketing Transcendentalism's Future$
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David Dowling

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780300197440

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300197440.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 23 June 2021

Introduction Embodying “The Newness”

Introduction Embodying “The Newness”

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction Embodying “The Newness”
Source:
Emerson's Protégés
Author(s):

David Dowling

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300197440.003.0001

This book examines the professional fates of an idealistic group of young talented writers in whom Ralph Waldo Emerson invested generous time, energy, creativity, and capital for their literary success. It explores the broader and richer historical context of the literary market that mitigated the material consequences of the careers of Emerson's protégés, which included Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Samuel Ward, Jones Very, Ellery Channing, and Charles Newcomb. It shows how Emerson sought to engender these collegians to carry the torch for “The Newness,” the name given to the transcendentalist movement in Concord. The book also places the significance of the protégés' apprenticeships within the conceptual framework of the social role of literary vocation in transcendental authorship, together with the concept of genius as the framework for Emerson's mentorship.

Keywords:   writers, Ralph Waldo Emerson, literary market, protégés, Henry David Thoreau, The Newness, transcendentalist movement, apprenticeships, genius, mentorship

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