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Charand-o ParandRevolutionary Satire from Iran, 1907-1909$
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Ali-Akbar Dehkhoda

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780300197990

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300197990.001.0001

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Sur-e Esrāfil, Series 1, No. 13, pp. 7–8

Sur-e Esrāfil, Series 1, No. 13, pp. 7–8

September 12, 1907

Chapter:
(p.144) Sur-e Esrāfil, Series 1, No. 13, pp. 7–8
Source:
Charand-o Parand
Author(s):

Ali-Akbar Dehkhodā

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300197990.003.0011

This chapter presents a column published on September 12, 1907, featuring a fictional letter describing hostilities with the Turks over lands on the Persian side of the mountains between Salmas and Margawar, west of Urmiya. In the course of the previous four centuries, frontier disputes with the Ottomans over the extensive pasturelands bordering Anatolia and northern Iraq (inhabited mainly by Kurds) had contributed to numerous wars. Between 1843 and 1865, international boundary commissions were convened, and surveys produced a detailed map of the whole frontier area, but no lasting agreement was signed until 1914. The hostilities referred in the letter resumed in early 1906 and continued through 1908. In his reply, Dehkhodā suggests that either the Shah or the Atābak had quietly colluded with the Ottomans to get rid of constitutionalists' forces in Urumiyeh.

Keywords:   Ottomans, Turks, land disputes, Urumiyeh, constitutionalists, Charand-o Parand, Ali-Akbar Dehkhodā, Sur-e Esrāfil, Iranian newspaper columns

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