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Climate CulturesAnthropological Perspectives on Climate Change$
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Jessica Barnes and Michael R Dove

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780300198812

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300198812.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 01 August 2021

Imagining Forest Futures and Climate Change

Imagining Forest Futures and Climate Change

The Mexican State as Insurance Broker and Storyteller

Chapter:
(p.199) Chapter 8 Imagining Forest Futures and Climate Change
Source:
Climate Cultures
Author(s):

Andrew S. Mathews

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300198812.003.0009

Forests in Mexico have become of interest as possible sites for climate change mitigation, through REDD (Reduced Emissions through Deforestation and Degradation) policies, which compensate landowners for averted carbon emissions. A comparison of management and planning regimes of industrial forestry (1926-the present) with present day scenario building practices and pilot REDD and payment for environmental services programs (PSA), shows the critical role of collective imaginations of what the state is and can do in guaranteeing the credibility of calculations of forest futures. Both in the past and in current regimes forestry officials are careful to avoid confronting rural people by enforcing forestry regulations. REDD modellers produce calculations of deforestation risk though socio-environmental scenarios about the future, in which imaginations of environmental degradation, including that which is carried out by indigenous people, becomes a potential source of value.

Keywords:   REDD/reduced emissions from degradation and deforestation, Mexico, Mexican forestry department, Payment for environmental services, Imagination and environmental degradation

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