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Meister EckhartPhilosopher of Christianity$
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Kurt Flasch

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780300204865

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300204865.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2019

Eckhart’s Intention

Eckhart’s Intention

Commentary on John, Part 1

Chapter:
(p.166) 13. Eckhart’s Intention
Source:
Meister Eckhart
Author(s):

Kurt Flasch

, Anne Schindel, Aaron Vanides
Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300204865.003.0013

This chapter examines Meister Eckhart's commentary on the Gospel of John. It first considers Johann Gottlieb Fichte's conception of man and mind in The Way towards the Blessed Life (Berlin, 1806) before turning to Eckhart's commentary on John. In particular, it discusses three important innovations in the commentary: first, Eckhart clarifies that he will demonstrate the unity of the Gospel and metaphysics; second, he developed his metaphysics of the verbum; and third, he uses the Aristotelian-Averroistic theory of the unity of the knower and the known to explain how the just man is within Justice. Eckhart's explanation of his method shows that he is making his intention known with regards to his interpretation of John and in all of his works: to demonstrate the truth of Christianity philosophically and to prove the bases of natural philosophy of the Gospel of John with philosophical argumentation.

Keywords:   mind, Meister Eckhart, Gospel of John, Johann Gottlieb Fichte, metaphysics, verbum, justice, Christianity, natural philosophy

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