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Diplomacy on IceEnergy and the Environment in the Arctic and Antarctic$
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Rebecca Pincus and Saleem H. Ali

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780300205169

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300205169.001.0001

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Crossing the Land of Indigenous People in the Arctic: Comparison of Russian and North American Experiences of Economic Growth and Human Rights in Energy and Infrastructure Projects

Crossing the Land of Indigenous People in the Arctic: Comparison of Russian and North American Experiences of Economic Growth and Human Rights in Energy and Infrastructure Projects

Chapter:
(p.198) 13. Crossing the Land of Indigenous People in the Arctic: Comparison of Russian and North American Experiences of Economic Growth and Human Rights in Energy and Infrastructure Projects
Source:
Diplomacy on Ice
Author(s):

Natalia Yakovleva

Richard Grover

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300205169.003.0014

This chapter examines interaction of indigenous peoples with hydrocarbon development projects in the Arctic. It draws evidence from two cases of large infrastructure projects in East Siberia: the Pacific Ocean oil pipeline in Russia and the Mackenzie Valley gas pipeline in Canada. Successful outcomes of negotiations with hydrocarbon projects over indigenous peoples’ interests depends on the degree of recognition of their rights over land and natural resources and their right to self-determination. Across the cases, the discussion about indigenous interests include concerns about environmental impacts, route planning, impact on economies and trades of indigenous communities, use of natural resources, employment and benefits for community development. The cases reviewed are set in different economic, institutional, and legal environments; nonetheless the concerns of indigenous communities over pipeline developments are remarkably similar. Finally, and most importantly, the approach to indigenous peoples’ matters adopted by commercial developers is very important in these projects, ranging from one that listens to the views and considers them in project planning to the one that shuns the concerns and excludes indigenous communities from decision-making and important planning discussions.

Keywords:   Eastern Siberia, Mackenzie Valley, pipeline, hydrocarbons, indigenous people, land rights

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