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Diplomacy on IceEnergy and the Environment in the Arctic and Antarctic$
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Rebecca Pincus and Saleem H. Ali

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780300205169

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300205169.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 24 June 2021

From Energy to Knowledge? Building Domestic Knowledge-Based Sectors around Hydro Energy in Iceland and Greenland

From Energy to Knowledge? Building Domestic Knowledge-Based Sectors around Hydro Energy in Iceland and Greenland

Chapter:
(p.113) 6. From Energy to Knowledge? Building Domestic Knowledge-Based Sectors around Hydro Energy in Iceland and Greenland
Source:
Diplomacy on Ice
Author(s):

Rasmus Gjedssø Bertelsen

Klaus Georg Hansen

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300205169.003.0007

Iceland and Greenland share historical and socioeconomic and political conditions as former or present North Atlantic autonomies of the Kingdom of Denmark. As very small natural resource-based economies, they strive to develop and diversify their economies. Hydropower potential has played a large role in Icelandic economic development, and may do so in Greenland. Literature has overlooked the knowledge economy of hydropower in Iceland and Greenland. Large-scale hydropower projects rest on knowledge in geology, glaciology, hydrology, biology, surveying, engineering, law, finance, planning, and more. This chapter focuses on the experiences and prospects of creating globally connected, domestic knowledge-based hydropower sectors in Iceland and Greenland. Iceland has through strong domestic education and brain circulation domesticized this knowledge and reaped more benefits from its hydropower. Greenland with a smaller and less educated workforce is facing significant challenges to fill the knowledge jobs in a hydropower sector.

Keywords:   Iceland, Greenland, economic diversification, hydropower, knowledge economy, triple helix, quadruple helix

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