Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Fortunes of Francis BarberThe True Story of the Jamaican Slave Who Became Samuel Johnson's Heir$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Bundock

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780300207101

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300207101.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 12 July 2020

“The Dunghill of the Universe”

“The Dunghill of the Universe”

Chapter:
(p.8) 2. “The Dunghill of the Universe”
Source:
The Fortunes of Francis Barber
Author(s):

Michael Bundock

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300207101.003.0002

This chapter speculates on the life of Francis Barber based on the biography written by James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson. According to Boswell, Barber was born in Jamaica and came to England with Colonel Richard Bathurst in 1750 when he was seven or eight years old. Barber must have became Bathurst’s property through either one of two ways: either he was purchased by Bathurst or he was the child of a woman slave whom Bathurst owned. It seems that Barber was at first called “Quashey” and that his origins were in slavery. Barber’s first known home was Bathurst’s estate, a sugar plantation. Following the collapse of his business, Bathurst decided to leave Jamaica for good and make his home in England, bringing the young Quashey with him.

Keywords:   biography, Francis Barber, James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Jamaica, England, Richard Bathurst, slavery, sugar plantation

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.