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Sincerity After CommunismA Cultural History$
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Ellen Rutten

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780300213980

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300213980.001.0001

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“But I Want Sincerity So Badly!”

“But I Want Sincerity So Badly!”

The Perestroika Years and Onward

Chapter:
(p.78) Chapter Two “But I Want Sincerity So Badly!”
Source:
Sincerity After Communism
Author(s):

Ellen Rutten

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300213980.003.0003

This chapter examines the genesis and development of a trend that interprets (post-)postmodern paradigms as vehicles for coping with cultural trauma, and how that trend plays out in contemporary sincerity rhetoric. It first considers the simultaneous emergence of North American and Russian new-sincerity discourses in the 1980s before discussing the trauma thread that permeates its Russian pendant from the very beginning. Central to the chapter's argument is poet-cum-performer and undisputed classic of recent Russian literature Dmitrii Prigov, and his personal creative story is interwoven into a wider narrative of sincerity and collective remembering. The story of Prigov and his contemporaries challenges the view, proposed by Mieke Bal and others, that sincerity rhetoric flourishes specifically in times of intercultural conflict. The chapter also explores existing notions of post-Soviet memory and post-Soviet Russia's insistence not on remembering but on a collective forgetting of the gloomier pages of Soviet history.

Keywords:   cultural trauma, sincerity rhetoric, Russia, Dmitrii Prigov, sincerity, remembering, Mieke Bal, intercultural conflict, memory, forgetting

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