Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Revolution Against EmpireTaxes, Politics, and the Origins of American Independence$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Justin du Rivage

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780300214246

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300214246.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 07 April 2020

Sons of Liberty, Sons of Licentiousness

Sons of Liberty, Sons of Licentiousness

Chapter:
(p.178) 6 Sons of Liberty, Sons of Licentiousness
Source:
Revolution Against Empire
Author(s):

Justin du Rivage

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300214246.003.0007

This chapter shows how colonists responded to the transformation of the British Empire. Radical resistance gained strength from economic anxiety and the fact that authoritarian imperial reform was clearly and explicitly designed to subordinate the colonial economy. American radicals, far from being libertarians, were fully committed to using the power of government to achieve their goals. They used the language of political economy to argue for a boycott of British goods, believing that this not only would stimulate American manufacturing but would make the colonies less dependent on the mother country. When a majority of colonists, who were keen observers of Britain's political scene, became convinced that authoritarian reformers had taken control of Westminster and Whitehall, they declared their independence.

Keywords:   British American colonists, radical resistance, authoritarian reforms, colonial economy, American radicals, political economy, boycotts, authoritarian reformers

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.