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The Green State in Africa$
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Carl Death

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780300215830

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300215830.001.0001

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Green African States and International Relations

Green African States and International Relations

Chapter:
(p.193) Chapter 6 Green African States and International Relations
Source:
The Green State in Africa
Author(s):

Carl Death

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300215830.003.0007

Transnational and international relations are also crucial to the production of green state effects, and this chapter profiles a range of examples, from climate change diplomacy, to environmental aid programmes, green ratings and indexes, and transnational social movement solidarity. Indeed, it is possible to account for the similarities and differences between Africa’s green states through various forms of international cooperation and conflict. Whereas dominant IR theories and ecological modernisation approaches tend to see international homogeneity, this chapters emphasises the production of difference, of heterogeneity, in Africa’s green state effects. A crucial mechanism for the production of this difference is the way leaders and laggards are produced. There are exemplary cases of environmental good practice, such as Tanzania’s national sustainable development strategy, or South African environmental diplomacy, which are often contrasted with laggards and pollution enclaves, such as the Niger Delta or the South Durban basin. One way to mitigate this uneven international topography is through forms of transnational and international solidarity, and the chapter concludes with the suggestion that critical green solidarity might be an important dimension of postcolonial Pan-Africanism.

Keywords:   Transnational, International Relations, Conflict, Cooperation, Homogeneity, Heterogeneity, Rankings, Niger Delta, Leaders, Laggards

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