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Ascending India and Its State CapacityExtraction, Violence, and Legitimacy$
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Sumit Ganguly and William R. Thompson

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780300215922

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300215922.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 21 January 2022

Extraction and Legitimacy

Extraction and Legitimacy

Chapter:
(p.75) Four Extraction and Legitimacy
Source:
Ascending India and Its State Capacity
Author(s):

Sumit Ganguly

William R. Thompson

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300215922.003.0004

This chapter discusses extraction and legitimacy. Extraction is about the state's ability to acquire the resources it needs to carry out its designed tasks. Whereas extraction tends to focus on material resources, legitimacy is an attitudinal resource for the state. The more legitimacy a state possess, presumably, the easier it is to call on its population for support. If the state must allocate all or most of its resources to simply staying in power by brute force, there is also less left to allocate to other problems. Ample attitudinal support therefore reduces the costs of state maintenance. Not surprisingly, India's extraction capacity is not well developed. More unusual is India's high scores on legitimacy, which so far are not deteriorating greatly. While India no doubt benefits from fairly consistent democratic institutions, Indian scores on this criterion put it among far more affluent states.

Keywords:   extraction, legitimacy, material resources, attitudinal resource, state maintenance

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