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Ascending India and Its State CapacityExtraction, Violence, and Legitimacy$
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Sumit Ganguly and William R. Thompson

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780300215922

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300215922.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 21 January 2022

Grand Strategy

Grand Strategy

Chapter:
(p.229) Ten Grand Strategy
Source:
Ascending India and Its State Capacity
Author(s):

Sumit Ganguly

William R. Thompson

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300215922.003.0010

This chapter discusses changes in India's grand strategy over time and weaknesses associated with its future plans. India has long had a grand strategy and a largely stable set of goals. One of its most consistent features has been the quest for great power status. It initially sought to achieve this through the pursuit of an ideational foreign policy. Ideational foreign policies stress leadership in promoting ideas such as nonalignment or third-world solidarity. Subsequently, India's grand strategy adopted a mix of ideational and material approaches in pursuit of those ends. In the wake of the Cold War, it has tilted quite significantly toward acquiring the requisite material capabilities to pursue that goal. Nevertheless, a segment of its policy-making apparatus seems unable and indeed unwilling to completely shed its attachment to some ideational concerns, however atavistic and very possibly counterproductive to its goal of achieving great power status.

Keywords:   India's grand strategy, great power status, ideational foreign policy, material capabilities

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