Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Conquest of DeathViolence and the Birth of the Modern English State$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Matthew Lockwood

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780300217063

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300217063.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

Economic Interest and the Oversight of Violence

Economic Interest and the Oversight of Violence

Chapter:
(p.197) Five Economic Interest and the Oversight of Violence
Source:
The Conquest of Death
Author(s):

Matthew Lockwood

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300217063.003.0006

While, earlier chapters establish that the officer and investigative techniques necessary to create a monopoly of violence were in place in England by the beginning of the sixteenth century, these alone only provided the potential for the effective regulation of violence. To ensure that the state’s definitions of legitimate and illegitimate violence were rigorously enforced, oversight of the coroner system was necessary. Chapter 5, therefore, charts the rise of a new, more robust system of oversight that came into effect in the sixteenth century. The growth of oversight, it is argued, began in the 1530s as a result of competing economic interests in the outcome of coroners’ inquests and the growing popularity of the central courts as a venue for adjudication. This combination of economic interest in forfeiture and greater central court involvement in forfeiture disputes resulted in a system of surveillance which allowed central government officials unprecedented control over the coroner system and thus, for the first time, an effective monopoly of lethal violence.

Keywords:   Almoner, Forfeiture, Litigation, Star Chamber, King’s Bench, Economic interest, Centralization, Oversight

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.