Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
EnragedWhy Violent Times Need Ancient Greek Myths$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Emily Katz Anhalt

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780300217377

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300217377.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 30 July 2021

Them and Us (Iliad 6)

Them and Us (Iliad 6)

Chapter:
(p.29) 2 Them and Us (Iliad 6)
Source:
Enraged
Author(s):

Emily Katz Anhalt

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300217377.003.0003

This chapter examines how the Iliad promotes the capacity of its audience as individuals to acknowledge and respect the essential humanity of every other individual. It explains how the Iliad enables its audience to get a glimpse of the Trojan War from the Trojans' perspective, as well as the surprisingly humanizing depiction of Hector within his city. The Iliad suggests that the recognition of multiple perspectives makes moral judgment possible. In addition to humanizing the enemy and perhaps promoting self-restraint and compassion, the Iliad delineates the spheres of men and women: warfare and politics for men; domestic activities, weaving, and child-rearing for women. The chapter concludes by arguing that the Iliad confronts its audience with the responsibility to reassess the conviction that the capacity for violence deserves the highest honors that the community can confer.

Keywords:   humanity, Trojan War, Iliad, Hector, moral judgment, self-restraint, compassion, warfare, violence, honor

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.