Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
(Not) Getting Paid to Do What You LoveGender, Social Media, and Aspirational Work$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Brooke Erin Duffy

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780300218176

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300218176.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 23 January 2022

“And Now, a Word from Our Sponsor”: Attracting Advertisers, Building Brands, Leveraging (Free) Labor

“And Now, a Word from Our Sponsor”: Attracting Advertisers, Building Brands, Leveraging (Free) Labor

Chapter:
(p.136) 5 “And Now, a Word from Our Sponsor”: Attracting Advertisers, Building Brands, Leveraging (Free) Labor
Source:
(Not) Getting Paid to Do What You Love
Author(s):

Brooke Erin Duffy

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300218176.003.0005

This chapter argues that social media economies are unfolding in ways that are highly uneven, favoring particular subjectivities of race, class, and body aesthetics. In particular, the chapter considers activities that might be defined as word-of-mouth marketing or—to use a more voguish term—“brand evangelism”: sharing products and messages within one's networked communities. And it's no small wonder that contemporary marketers seek to incorporate social media producers into their promotional arsenals: their built-in audience furnishes social capital and enables companies to leverage ostensibly “authentic” or “organic” brand communication. However, the picture that emerges is one where existing social hierarchies are exacerbated both inside and outside these branded worlds.

Keywords:   advertising, brand evangelism, word-of-mouth marketing, networked communities, social capital, brand communication, social hierarchies, social media

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.