Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
(Not) Getting Paid to Do What You LoveGender, Social Media, and Aspirational Work$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Brooke Erin Duffy

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780300218176

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300218176.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 23 January 2022

The “Instagram Filter”: Dispelling the Myths of Entrepreneurial Glamour

The “Instagram Filter”: Dispelling the Myths of Entrepreneurial Glamour

Chapter:
(p.185) 6 The “Instagram Filter”: Dispelling the Myths of Entrepreneurial Glamour
Source:
(Not) Getting Paid to Do What You Love
Author(s):

Brooke Erin Duffy

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300218176.003.0006

This chapter examines the way by which the fulltime social media producers articulated their work styles: they lauded the flexibility and autonomy of their pieced-together careers while drawing attention to some of the less glossy features of the independent work-style. Indeed, the social media professionals detailed careers marked by a chaotic pace of work, periods of insecurity, and the demand to be ever-present to both audiences and advertisers. These individuals thus engage in aspirational labor, albeit of a different sort: they labor persistently—and at times, invisibly—to maintain their status in the midst of a “political economy of insecurity,” where neoliberal ideologies and practices shift organizational risks and responsibilities onto the individual.

Keywords:   social media producers, work styles, independent work-style, social media professionals, social media careers, aspirational labor, political economy, insecurity, neoliberalism

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.