Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
A Dark InheritanceBlood, Race, and Sex in Colonial Jamaica$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Brooke N. Newman

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780300225556

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300225556.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 28 June 2022

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
A Dark Inheritance
Author(s):

Brooke N. Newman

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300225556.003.0001

In December 1825, John Campbell, John Manderson, and Thomas Raeburn, prosperous and respectable merchants of mixed ancestry from Montego Bay, a bustling port on Jamaica’s northwestern coast, sent a memorial on behalf of the free people of color in St. James parish to William Burge, Jamaica’s attorney general, for submission to the Commissioners of Legal Inquiry in the West Indies. Alexander Sympson from the Kingston Committee of People of Colour, a group formed to put pressure on the colonial legislature to grant free people of mixed descent equal rights with whites, submitted an additional memorial claiming to represent “the body of free coloured persons on the island.” Appointed by the Colonial Office following the British imperial government’s adoption of an amelioration policy in 1823, calculated to improve the moral and physical condition of the enslaved “such as may prepare them for a participation in those civil rights and privileges which are enjoyed by other classes of his majesty’s subjects,” the commissioners had returned to Jamaica to collect answers to the questions posed to local officials during their first visit in the spring of 1825. As news of the commissioners’ arrival circulated through the island, leading free men of color moved swiftly to make known the grievances of those already free and of mixed blood....

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.