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Ending Book HungerAccess to Print Across Barriers of Class and Culture$

Lea Shaver

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780300226003

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300226003.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

(p.201) Index

(p.201) Index

Source:
Ending Book Hunger
Publisher:
Yale University Press
“Access to Print in Low-Income and Middle-Income Communities” (Neuman and Celano), 19–20
affordable books, 15–26;
Creative Commons and, 147–148;
Dolly Parton and Imagination Library, 16–19, 22–26;
donations, 25–26;
First Book and, 21–26;
high-volume sales and, 23–24;
paperback versus hardcover, 24–25;
publisher exclusivity and, 24–25;
social class and book abundance versus scarcity, 19–21
Africa:
African Storybook Project, 81–83, 147, 178;
children’s publishing in, 49–50;
extent of book hunger in, 2;
Zulu language publishing, 7–8
All American Boys, 34
Allington, Richard, 6
Amazon.com, 71, 84, 85
American Federation for the Blind, 105
American Society of Composers and Publishers (ASCAP), 128–129
Annual Haircut Day, The (Noni), 56
Asia Foundation, 50, 68. See also Books for Asia
Association of American Publishers, 121–122
Au, Julie, 6
Aufderheide, Patricia, 123
authorship and artistic creativity, 154–166;
expectation of financial reward, 160–162;
in Iceland, 154–157;
intrinsic motivation and, 157–160, 164–166; (p.202)
as parallel to playing sports, 163–164
Avril, Lynne, 27–28
BBC Magazine, 154
Beebe, Barton, 120
Belize, book distribution system, 74, 179
Benkler, Yochai, 142
Bentley, Lionel, 137–138
Berger, Alisha, 51–53
Bergman, Orit, 43–44
Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary Works (1886), 128
Bishop, Rudine Sims, 29–31
Bjarnason, Baldur, 155–156
blind and print-disabled readers:
Benetech (Bookshare) and, 101–103;
Chafee Amendment, 101, 103, 104, 106, 127–128;
and copyright permissions, 98–101;
George Kerscher and text-to-speech software, 96–98;
innovative technologies for, 108–110;
and international copyright, 104–106;
Marrakesh Treaty, 106, 138–139, 140;
numbers of, 107–108
Blu, 86
book effect, 5
book hunger:
Creative Commons and, 151–152;
and digital distribution, 176–178;
extent of, 2–3, 50, 167–168;
importance of addressing, 3–6;
importance of public awareness about, 178;
and need for mass translation, 169–175;
print strategies, 179–183;
reading as human right, 61–63;
resistance to market solutions, 6–10
Books for Asia:
and digital distribution, 91–92;
distribution challenges, 65–66, 67–71, 77;
Zavala on neglected languages, 50
Bort, Julie, 161
Boston Globe, 15, 17
Brazil, copyright law, 129
Bumiller, Elisabeth, 128–129
Business Insider, 161
Butcher, Neil, 49
Cambridge University Press v. Patton, 122
Celano, Donna, 19–20
cell phones/mobile phones, 80–81, 86–88, 90, 91, 177
Chafee Amendment, 101, 103, 104, 106, 127–128
Chameleon That Saved Noah’s Ark, The (Mochadsky), 43–44
Chaudhry, Manisha, 58–59, 60, 61
China, copyright exceptions, 119
Codex Group, 89
college textbooks and Creative Commons, 148–149 (p.203)
Computerized Books for the Blind and Print Disabled, 97–98
Cooper, Harris, 6
Copyright Clearance Center, 121–122
copyright law:
international issues and the Marrakesh Treaty, 106, 138–139, 140;
litigation risks for nonprofits, 125–126;
requesting permissions, 99–101, 172–174;
statutory damages rules, 126–127;
and translation, 145
—exceptions, 128–140;
Chafee Amendment, 101, 103, 104, 106, 127–128;
common types of, 129;
compensation and, 130–131;
international copyright treaties, 128, 131–132;
public pressure and, 128–129;
as tool to promote access to knowledge, 131–132;
for translations, 133–139;
and ways to protect authors and publishers, 132–134. See also fair use doctrine
Creative Commons licenses:
and book affordability, 147–148;
and book hunger, 151–152;
and college textbooks, 148–149;
copyright and, 143;
experimenting with, 152–153;
government funding and, 151;
history of, 143–145;
open translation, 145–147;
Story-Weaver and, 141–142;
types of, 149–151
Crystal, David, 46–47
cultural specificity, 27–29, 171
DAISY format, 103
Deci, Edward, 158–159
DePaola, Tomi, 171
digital distribution, 77–95;
advantages of, 92–95;
African Storybook Project slide shows, 81–83;
and book hunger, 176–178;
e-books and e-readers, 76, 77–78, 84–86, 101–103;
and fair use (see fair use doctrine);
First Book and, 22;
formats, 90;
Internet access, 79–80;
mobile phones/cell phones, 80–81, 86–88, 90, 91, 177;
on-demand printing, 83;
Pratham Books’ shift from print to digital distribution, 75–76;
reading digital versus reading print, 88–92;
Worldreader’s Kindle programs, 84–86
digital scanners, 101–103
Direct Mail Services, 73
distribution, 64–78;
Books for Asia, innovative strategies of, 67–71;
First Book and, 71, 72, 76;
Imagination Library and, 71, 73–74, 76;
“last mile” challenges, 64–66;
paperback versus hardcover, 179–180;
print, 179–183;
reading digital versus reading print, 88–92;
use of postal systems, 76–77. See also digital distribution (p.204)
diversity:
Bishop’s “windows and mirrors” concept, 29–31;
and children’s picture books, 171–172;
digital revolution and, 93;
First Book and, 35–37;
improving racial diversity, 29–31;
PJ Library and, 39–44;
problem of cultural specificity, 27–29, 36–37;
promoting, 44–45;
in publishing industry, 37–39;
We Need Diverse Books campaign, 31–34, 37–38, 44
Documentary Filmmakers’ Statement About Best Practices in Fair Use, 123
Dollywood Foundation, 16–19
Dotson, David, 18, 20, 24–26, 66, 73, 74
Drum Dream Girl, 171
Dyslexia International, 107
e-books and e-readers, 22, 76, 77–88, 92–93, 101–103, 107, 121
economic crises (1980s), 1–2
English language, dominance of, 46–47
Entwisle, Doris, 6
Ethnologue, 47
Eureka Myth, The (Silbey), 157–158
Evans, Gary, 6
Evans, Mariah, 5
Evans, Tanyella, 86, 91, 93
fair use doctrine, 111–124;
defending fair use, 116–118;
establishing guidelines for, 122–124;
hypothetical nonprofit publishing project, 113–119;
international interpretations, 118–119;
interpretation of, 111–113;
and market harm, 115–116;
non-profit educational purposes and, 115;
Sony Corporation of America v. Universal City Studios, Inc., 98–99;
transformative, 115;
vague and general provisions of, 119–122
Fault in Our Stars, The (Green), 161
fiction versus nonfiction, 4
film industry, 98–99, 106, 123–124
First Book:
and book affordability, 21–26, 182;
distribution, 71, 72, 76;
and diverse books, 35–37, 44
First Book Marketplace, 22
Flickr, 144, 149–150
Forlagid, 156
Forum on Child and Family Statistics, 3
France, copyright law, 129
Fruchterman, Jim, 101–103, 104–105, 106, 125
Gaiman, Neil, 4
Georgia State University, 121–122
Germany, copyright law, 119, 129, 130
Global Book Alliance, 178
GNU Free Documentation License, 144
Goldsmith, Rosie, 154
Google, 135, 144–145, 150 (p.205)
Grameen Bank microlending, 10–11
Green, John, 160–161
HarperCollins, 103
Hebrew, children’s literature in, 43–44
Hewlett Foundation, 144, 148
Hindi, 48
Iceland, authorship and publishing in, 154–157
Imagination Library, 66, 71, 73–74, 76, 179;
and book affordability, 16–19, 22–26
Imani’s Moon, 171
Indestructibles, 180
India, 48, 137–138. See also Pratham Books
Indian Copyright Act (1914), 137
intrinsic motivation, 157–160, 164–166
Israel, Hebrew children’s literature, 43–44
Jazsi, Peter, 123
Jenkins, Steve, 171
Johannsson, Egill, 155–157
John, Gautam, 152
Johnson, Nicole, 32, 33–34, 37, 38
Johnson, Samuel, 154, 162–163
Joy Luck Club, The (Tan), 33
Kamatha, Ashok, 55
Kar-Ben Publishing, 40
Katz, Vikki, 80
Kelley, Jonathan, 5
Kerscher, George, 96–101, 104, 108, 124
Kimia, Lian, 43
Kindle reading device, 20, 84–87, 89, 91
Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley, Inc., 133–134
Klein, Samara, 40, 41–43
Krashen, Stephen, 6
Kumar, Mala, 58, 60–61
Ladakhi language translations, 147
languages:
digital distribution and, 93–94;
dominant, 46–48, 49;
Room to Read publishing program and, 50–53. See also neglected languages; translation
Languages of the World (Ethnologue), 47
Larson, Reed, 158
Leval, Pierre, 112
library fines, 20–21
Library for All. See Nabu.org
Lindsay, Jim, 6
literacy/illiteracy, 2, 4, 54, 134, 167–168
Little Engine that Could, The (Piper), 17
machine translation, 135, 169
Manjhi Moves a Mountain, 171
market failure, 6–10
Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired, or Otherwise Print Disabled, 106, 138–139, 140 (p.206)
mass customization, 180–181
mass translation, 169–175;
and ending book hunger, 139–140;
permissions for, 172–174;
selecting books for, 171–172;
using volunteers and amateurs, 169–170
McDonald, Joseph, 112
McGill-Franzen, Anne, 6
McQuillan, Jeff, 6
Menon, Rekha, 55
Meta-Analytic Review of Experiments Examining the Effect of Extrinsic Rewards on Intrinsic Motivation (Deci et al.), 159
microlending/microfinance, 10–11
mobile memory cards, 177
mobile phones/cell phones, 80–81, 86–88, 90, 91, 177
Mochadsky, Yael, 43–44
Motion Picture Association of America, 106
Myers, Walter Dean, 31
Nabu.org (Library for All), 63, 86–87, 178
neglected languages:
economic realities of publishing in, 47–50;
market failure and, 8–9;
Pratham Books and Ladakhi, 147;
translation exceptions for, 133–138, 139–140;
Zulu, 7–8
Nepal, yak-back distribution in, 64–65
Neuman, Susan B., 19–20
New York Times, 31
niche books/niche markets, 39–44, 93, 139, 165–166. See also neglected languages
Nilekani, Rohini, 55–56, 164–165
Nimmer, David, 120
Njala Nakolombo: Hunger Is a Monster, 50
Nussbaum, Martha, 3–4
Okediji, Ruth, 131
Open Content License, 144
open licensing, 143–145. See also Creative Commons licenses
open-source software movement, 143–144
open translation, 145–147
optical character recognition (OCR), 102
Pae, SooHyun, 145–146
Parton, Dolly, 15–19
pastiche, 129
peer production, 142
Penguin, 24–25
Perl, Erica, 65
pharmaceutical companies and patent exceptions, 133
Pijama, Sifriyat, 43
Piper, Watty, 17
PJ Library, 39–44, 45
Portuguese-language publishing, 49
Position Paper on Controlled Digital Lending, 123
poverty, and book hunger, 2–3. See also affordable books (p.207)
Pratham Books, 54–61;
and author incentives, 164–165;
and Creative Commons, 147, 152;
and distribution, 66–67, 75–76, 177, 178;
formatting for mobile phones, 90;
and illiteracy, 54–55;
mission and sales, 55–57;
and oral traditions, 58–59;
and the right to read, 63;
Story-Weaver, 141–142;
translating and printing, 59–61, 169–170;
and use of professional writers and illustrators, 57–58
Publishers’ Association of South Africa, 8
publishing, commercial:
and affordable books, 23–25;
and copyright law (see copyright law);
diversity in, 37–39;
and donation of remaindered books, 68–69;
and donation of translation rights, 172–174;
and e-books, 92–93, 103, 107, 121;
in Iceland, 154–157;
and market failure, 6–10;
and neglected languages, 47–50;
and readers with disabilities, 108–109
publishing, international, 41–44
publishing, nonprofit/charitable:
challenges of, 11–14;
digital distribution and, 94–95;
and fair use, 113–119, 122–123;
litigation risks for, 125–126;
and readers with disabilities, 108–109
“Read Aloud 15 Minutes” national campaign, 3
Reclaiming Fair Use: How to Put Balance Back in Copyright (Aufderheide, Jazsi), 123
Recording for the Blind, 99
Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic, 102, 104
remaindered books, 68–69, 70, 72
Richmond, Caroline Tung, 32–33, 34, 37–38
Rideout, Victoria, 80
Rimerman, Susan, 77, 87–88, 89, 90–91, 92
Risher, David, 83–86
Rocket, Wendy, 68–69
Room to Read, 50–53, 63, 64
Rowling, J. K., 161–162
Russia, Jewish children’s books in, 42–43
Samuelson, Pamela, 120–121
Shadow and Substance (Bishop), 29–31
Shah, Purvi, 75–76
Shin, Fay, 6
Sikora, Joanna, 5
Silbey, Jessica, 157–158
SIL International, 167, 170
Singh, Suzanne, 54–55, 56, 57, 66–67, 147, 152
Sony Corporation of America v. Universal City Studios, Inc., 98–99
South Korea, Creative Commons in, 146
Spanish language market, 41–42
Stallman, Richard, 143–144 (p.208)
statutory damages rules, 126–127
Stockholm Protocol, 138
storybook approach to teaching reading, 174–175
Strega Nona (DePaola), 171
summer vacations, 5–6
Tagore, Rabindranath, 137–138
Tan, Amy, 33
Tanzania library slide shows, 81–83
Techno, 86
textbooks, 4, 133, 148–149, 174
Torvalds, Linus, 143–144
translation (mass translation):
copyright exceptions for, 133–138;
and Creative Commons, 145–146;
crowdsourcing, 169;
and ending book hunger, 139–140;
as fair use, 122–124;
funding for, 174;
permissions for, 172–174;
selecting books for, 171–172;
textbooks versus storybooks, 174–175;
using volunteers and amateurs, 169–170
Translators Without Borders, 134, 169
Tumblr, 162
Uganda, accommodating linguistic diversity in, 93–94
Underpants Dance (Zapf), 27–28
United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (Article 17), 62
United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, 172–174
United States:
book hunger in, 3, 5–6;
copyright exceptions, 129, 130, 131
U.S. Department of Education, 103
University of Wisconsin Cooperative Children’s Book Center, 29, 38–39
Vietnam:
copyright exceptions, 119;
libraries and distribution, 70;
publishing in, 53
Vision Loss Expert Group, 107
Wealth of Networks, The (Benkler), 142
Welch, Tessa, 83
We Need Diverse Books campaign, 31–34, 37–38, 44
Wensink, Patrick, 161
What Do You Do with a Tail Like That? (Jenkins), 171
Whitehead, Nicole, 6
Wikipedia, 142, 144
windows and mirrors concept, 30–31
WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization), 105, 131–132, 140
Wood, John, 64
Wordpress, 162
World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), 105, 131–132, 140
Worldreader, 77, 84–86, 87, 178
World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on (p.209) Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property (TRIPs), 132
writer’s block, 160–161
writing and writers. See authorship and artistic creativity
YouTube, 113, 142
Yunus, Mohammed, 10–11
Zambian languages, 50, 52
Zapf, Marlena, 27–28
Zavala, Melody, 50, 65, 68, 70–71, 91–92
Zero Textbook Cost Degree, 148
Zimmer, Kyle, 35, 36–37, 65
Zulu language publishing, 7–8, 49–50