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Belonging on an IslandBirds, Extinction, and Evolution in Hawai'i$
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Daniel Lewis

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780300229646

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300229646.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

Becoming Endemic

Becoming Endemic

The White-eye, the Territorial Government, the Hui Manu, and Introduced Species

Chapter:
(p.178) Four Becoming Endemic
Source:
Belonging on an Island
Author(s):

Daniel Lewis

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300229646.003.0005

This chapter examines the Japanese White-eye, Zosterops japonicus, and the confounding nature of introduced species, some of which have been here long enough to have evolved into something unique to the islands. The White-eye, also known by its Japanese name Mejiro, has been a fixture in the islands since it was introduced on Oʻahu by the Hawaiʻi Board of Commissioners of Agriculture and Forestry (BCAF) in 1929, which was interested in birds primarily as a form of insect control. The White-eye's introduction was then continued by the Hui Manu, a private group founded in 1930 as an acclimatization society that introduced birds from around the world for aesthetic reasons.

Keywords:   Japanese White-eye, Zosterops japonicas, Mejiro, introduced species, BCAF, Hui Manu

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