Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Quest for StatusChinese and Russian Foreign Policy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Deborah Welch Larson and Alexei Shevchenko

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780300236040

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300236040.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 20 June 2021

The Social Creativity of Deng and Gorbachev

The Social Creativity of Deng and Gorbachev

Chapter:
(p.134) 4 The Social Creativity of Deng and Gorbachev
Source:
Quest for Status
Author(s):

Deborah Welch Larson

Alexei Shevchenko

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300236040.003.0004

This chapter interprets the reforms by Deng Xiaoping and Mikhail Gorbachev in the context of their efforts to find alternative means to great power status—through social creativity. Deng launched the “reform and opening” policy, developing the economic foundation for China to play a great power role while exercising unparalleled diplomatic flexibility in dealing with some of China's most difficult territorial and sovereignty disputes. Gorbachev abandoned Russia's usual military methods for achieving great power status in favor of promoting a new, idealistic philosophy for a more peaceful and harmonious world—the “New Thinking.” While Gorbachev's ideas enjoyed remarkable success internationally, the failure of his domestic reforms, along with the rise of nationalism, contributed to the breakup of the Soviet Union and an end to the Soviet Union's status as an innovator of new principles for world order.

Keywords:   Deng Xiaoping, Mikhail Gorbachev, great power, power status, social creativity, New Thinking

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.