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Stop Mugging GrandmaThe 'Generation Wars' and Why Boomer Blaming Won't Solve Anything$
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Jennie Bristow

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780300236835

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300236835.001.0001

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Social insecurities and grown-up policy-making

Social insecurities and grown-up policy-making

Chapter:
(p.211) Chapter 10 Social insecurities and grown-up policy-making
Source:
Stop Mugging Grandma
Author(s):

Jennie Bristow

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300236835.003.0010

This chapter considers some solutions for the generation wars. Indeed, it argues that, in terms of the generation wars, the answer is simple: just stop fighting them. There is no conflict between the generations, and there is nothing to be gained from inciting one. This is a symbolic conflict, driven by an elite in thrall to two fashionable prejudices: doomography and gerontophobia. The former term refers to demographic perceptions created to raise concerns about intergenerational equity. By exposing these prejudices and the pessimistic outlook on which they are based, the chapter looks for more positive ways of addressing the problems that are evaded by the distorted focus on so-called generational inequalities.

Keywords:   social insecurities, generation wars, generational inequalities, intergenerational equity, doomography, gerontophobia

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