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Gentlemen of Uncertain FortuneHow Younger Sons Made Their Way in Jane Austen's England$
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Rory Muir

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780300244311

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300244311.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

The Law

The Law

Attorneys and Solicitors

Chapter:
(p.114) Chapter Six The Law
Source:
Gentlemen of Uncertain Fortune
Author(s):

Rory Muir

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300244311.003.0006

This chapter looks to the other branch of the legal profession: the attorneys and solicitors. Attorneys and solicitors dealt directly with the client and cover a vast range of legal matters, including wills, property transfers, and other affairs that usually do not need to be tested in court. Attorneys were much more numerous than barristers in Regency England. The social standing of attorneys relative to the gentry, the clergy, and other genteel professions was also open to doubt. They certainly lacked the prestige of barristers. Indeed, attorneys seemed little better than school-teachers or the better sort of shopkeeper: respectable enough in their way, but not a career for the younger sons of the gentry. However, as the chapter shows, attorneys were also considered a rather gentlemanly profession, and many gentlemen indeed prospered by becoming one.

Keywords:   attorneys, solicitors, legal professions, law, legal matters

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